Introduction

Ever wondered how it is like to live in a small house? How will a tiny house make a big impact in your life? The Tiny House concept has invaded the real estate business and has given a new meaning to comfort and economical living. There are a lot of people and families who have considered tiny house living.

In fact, there are some who have found the perfect tiny house and have already moved in. However, despite the continued rise in its popularity, there are still who are half-hearted in going tiny. There are still some skeptics, not because they are claustrophobic, but because they are unsure if they can find a community that supports the tiny house concept.

This is a valid concern, living in a tiny house means that you will undergo lifestyle changes. Like any other life changes that we will undergo, we need to have other people who can support us. It can be in the form of a group support, or a friend who has gone through the same changes, this way we will get insights on how to deal with any challenges appropriately.

When you decide to live tiny, you also need to have the support of people who made the big decision to go tiny. You need to have a support group that will aid you in this life-changing decision. This is why it is important to be part of a tiny house community. A community of people or families who are already enjoying living in a tiny home. People who have joined the tiny house movement.

Where will you find a tiny house community? What is the tiny house movement? Do you have other questions about this type of community? Worry not, this article will provide you with all needed information about what a tiny house community is, what the pros and cons are when joining this community, where to join them, and ways on how to start a tiny house community.

What is the Tiny House Movement?

You may have seen or have heard about the Tiny House Movement. You may have read an article about this movement and thought, there is such movement. Is this the same thing as living in a tiny house?

1) History

The start of the Tiny House Movement fad can be traced to 1998 when Sarah Susanka published “The Not So Big House.” Her book then became a bestseller and reached Amazon’s number one spot. Sarah’s book has inspired people with her arguments regarding environmental benefits of living in small houses.

Before Sarah, there were a couple of people who were pursued living in compact spaces. In 1854, there was Henry David Thoreau who described his experience in living in a cabin that measures 150-square feet in his published book Walden. This book has then given modern tiny house enthusiasts a blueprint of modest living in small residences.

We also have Lloyd Kahn and Bob Easton who authored “Shelter” in 1973 which has discussions about the past and present architecture with indigenous construction steps. An added bonus to the book is the 1250+ small-house illustrations. These designs include Togo’s houses to Bedouin tents.

On the other hand, Lester Walker published his book entitled “Tiny Houses: or How to Get Away From It All” which listed photos and sketches of different projects ranging from a 56-square-foot shack to a 192-square-foot prefab home.

All of these people and their books contributed to the start of the Tiny House Movement.

2) Is Bigger Always Better?

You would agree with me that sometimes bigger is better. Imagine this; you are looking for a place to eat, the first thing you check is if the amount is reasonable. Then, you check if the food serving is reasonable based on the prices, most of the time you will base the amount from how big the food serving.

Another is when you are choosing an automobile; you decide based on the amount, design, brand, and whether it a small or big automobile. This is another example of bigger is better.
The last is when we choose to purchase a house; you want to choose a house based on the design, amount and how big it is.

These reasons solidify the concept of bigger is better. However, things change, change is inevitable, people became more critical when choosing things that they buy, especially when it comes to buying a property. People now have an option to live comfortably in a house that is cheaper and smaller.

The idea of living in a small house was reinforced because of the unending fluctuation in the real-estate business. There are a lot of people who have found an alternative housing scheme to help them with their monthly mortgage; it helps them divert the savings they get from their monthly house mortgage to other things. The eagerness of people to look for a livable tiny house brought light to the tiny house movement.

3) Meet the People who Decided to go Tiny

The tiny house movement is a social movement that supports the concept of living in a tiny house and encourages comfortable and economical living. People who have joined this movement have experienced a huge change in their lifestyle.

The tiny house movement has gained its popularity all over the world. People joined this movement for a lot of reasons. Some have decided to join this because of their aspiration to achieve financial freedom, others because of other reasons like being ecologically friendly, can move from one place to the other.

Meet the people who decided to trade a bigger house for a smaller and simple living – and are very much happy with what they did.

Brandon Irwin

Brandon Irwin, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Kansas State University, decided to move from a rental to a tiny house measuring 360-square foot. For around $40,000, he and his friends built the structure for quite a few months.

“Living in a tiny house has freed up a lot physical and mental energy,” says Irwin. Ten minutes is all it takes for him to clean his whole home and he even shares it with his Australian shepherd, Jimmy.

You can check his tiny house living experience on his blog Earth to Brandon.

Vera Struck

Vera Struck’s tiny house is built on sustainability. Her home which is nicknamed Silver Bullet is composed of 75 percent of reclaimed, repurposed and recycled non-toxic and healthy materials.
What makes Vera’s house the bomb is that it has a solar power, water harvesting systems and a composting and urine-diverting toilet.

As a cancer survivor, she took up the challenge of building, designing and living in a tiny house in 2012. With a total cost of less than 20,000 dollars, she was able to finish the house in two years. Now the house stands on the main floor of 135 square feet.

She has recently garnered the Best Tiny Home Award in Florida’s Tiny House Festival in 2016. Now, she is traveling around the country in her tiny home with more than 15,000 miles covered. She works as an educator and a sustainability advocate.

To her, the tiny house movement is a way for people to take control of their lifestyles.
“Customize your home to your needs,” she says. “Feed your soul.”

Gabriella and Andrew Morrison

After noticing that their family’s dynamics have started eroding, the Morrison family was experiencing a strained and combative time together. “Everyone scattered to opposite corners of the house,” says Gabriella Morrison.

Fascinated by the tiny house movement, Morrison decided to sell their home. Their son went to a boarding school to pursue hockey while the couple together with their daughter went ahead and lived in a pop-up tent trailer on a beach in Mexico.

It was a struggle for the first month. “Then we realized living with the least was the happiest we’d ever been,” says Gabriella.

For more than three years, they have lived in their tiny house that they built in the mountains around Ashland Oregon.

Check out the Morrison’s tiny house in Tiny House Build.

Christian Parsons and Alexis Stephens

Traveling in their 130 square foot house, the bloggers and videographers Alexis Stephens and Christian Parsons are going on adventures and explorations across Canada and U.S.

Stephen states that “this movement is creating more sustainable housing, more meaningful lifestyles and more connected communities.”

Being advocates of simple living, they have created an informative docu-series called “Living Tiny Legally” and records their tiny house adventures on Youtube.

You can check the two on Twitter and Instagram.

Jewel D. Pearson

Despite living in a 360 square feet house, Jewel rocks a walk-in closet, a bathroom that’s comparable to a spa, a balcony of her bedroom and a porch that’s folded-up and screened-in.

“You don’t have to give up luxuries to live in a tiny house,” she says.

After her daughter left for college, she sold her house and turned to tiny house living. She built her future home on a trailer with the help of her sister, a friend, and a general contractor.

Now, she has become a tiny home consultant and advocate going around the country and inspiring others who want to go tiny. You can follow her on her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

4) Types of Tiny Houses

Tiny homes are not only limited to being just regular houses that are downsized. Here we take a look at different tiny home types that works great for any lifestyle.

Bus Conversions

As a popular DIY project, buses are perfect to build your new tiny house. Once all the seats are removed, you will be left with a lot of space that you can use for your home design. A total blank canvas that is waiting for your creative mind to fill.

Before buying a bus, decide first on what you want to put in your home. A bus’ width is consistent, but the length varies with a maximum size of 40’. Buses allow natural light to get inside since the walls are mainly composed of windows. For privacy concerns, simply add a curtain.

Cob Houses

A cob may look like just a small clay hut but, it is more than that. It is a combination of clay, sand, and straw that works perfectly in becoming an all-natural material for your dream house.

Durable and cheap, a cob house that’s taken care of will last a lifetime. In England alone, there are several cob structures that have been standing for over 500 years.

The main key here is to place an overhanging roof that will keep moisture away from the exterior walls. With a strong foundation, a cob house will be safe from elements.

Vardo Tiny Homes

Vardo tiny homes are based on British Romani Wagons that is perfect for a minimalist lifestyle. Traditional vardos were horse-drawn and designed ornately. The inside boasts of woodworks and intricate carvings. Modern vardos, however, are towed behind vehicles and has the iconic designs of a bow top and some large frames on their frame’s exteriors.

Having a rounded top, the bed is mostly placed on the wagon’s widest parts. The top’s design is great in minimizing side effects of strong winds.

RVs

It is said that the original tiny houses are RVs. The small living quarters made it possible for being used as a low budget housing and campers even before the tiny house movement trend came to be. If you want to downsize, a standard option is an RV. It is perfect for mobility, and no construction is needed.

There are ready-made RVs available in the market. It is also a good start in seeing if a tiny house suits you. A major drawback in living in an RV is that it’s not designed for cold winters unless you do some serious renovations.

Trailer Homes

Trailer homes are sometimes confused with being the same as an RV. Trailer homes are tiny houses that were constructed on a trailer that’s on the back of a truck. Being the most common tiny home design, trailer homes were the first to gain the attention of the media.

If you want to create a trailer home, you can either hire a contractor or DIY. For cost effectiveness, frames are mostly made from timber. It is chosen for its mobility. If you like living in different sceneries, then this mobile home is excellent for you.

Shipping Containers

As the most mainstream tiny house design, the shipping containers come in different materials. There are even wood shipping containers. What makes these containers great is their feature of being hurricane and fireproof. It is one of the most durable options for starting a tiny home.

You can choose from various sizes. By simply adding windows and porches, you create a tiny home that’s perfect for a simple lifestyle.

These are just some of the many tiny house types in the world. Some make use of yurts, A-frame cabins, and houseboats.

You may also want to read: 15 Best Small Space Decorating Ideas.

Introduction

Ever wondered how it is like to live in a small house? How will a tiny house make a big impact in your life? The Tiny House concept has invaded the real estate business and has given a new meaning to comfort and economical living. There are a lot of people and families who have considered tiny house living.

In fact, there are some who have found the perfect tiny house and have already moved in. However, despite the continued rise in its popularity, there are still who are half-hearted in going tiny. There are still some skeptics, not because they are claustrophobic, but because they are unsure if they can find a community that supports the tiny house concept.

This is a valid concern, living in a tiny house means that you will undergo lifestyle changes. Like any other life changes that we will undergo, we need to have other people who can support us. It can be in the form of a group support, or a friend who has gone through the same changes, this way we will get insights on how to deal with any challenges appropriately.

When you decide to live tiny, you also need to have the support of people who made the big decision to go tiny. You need to have a support group that will aid you in this life-changing decision. This is why it is important to be part of a tiny house community. A community of people or families who are already enjoying living in a tiny home. People who have joined the tiny house movement.

Where will you find a tiny house community? What is the tiny house movement? Do you have other questions about this type of community? Worry not, this article will provide you with all needed information about what a tiny house community is, what the pros and cons are when joining this community, where to join them, and ways on how to start a tiny house community.

What is the Tiny House Movement?

You may have seen or have heard about the Tiny House Movement. You may have read an article about this movement and thought, there is such movement. Is this the same thing as living in a tiny house?

1) History

The start of the Tiny House Movement fad can be traced to 1998 when Sarah Susanka published “The Not So Big House.” Her book then became a bestseller and reached Amazon’s number one spot. Sarah’s book has inspired people with her arguments regarding environmental benefits of living in small houses.

Before Sarah, there were a couple of people who were pursued living in compact spaces. In 1854, there was Henry David Thoreau who described his experience in living in a cabin that measures 150-square feet in his published book Walden. This book has then given modern tiny house enthusiasts a blueprint of modest living in small residences.

We also have Lloyd Kahn and Bob Easton who authored “Shelter” in 1973 which has discussions about the past and present architecture with indigenous construction steps. An added bonus to the book is the 1250+ small-house illustrations. These designs include Togo’s houses to Bedouin tents.

On the other hand, Lester Walker published his book entitled “Tiny Houses: or How to Get Away From It All” which listed photos and sketches of different projects ranging from a 56-square-foot shack to a 192-square-foot prefab home.

All of these people and their books contributed to the start of the Tiny House Movement.

2) Is Bigger Always Better?

You would agree with me that sometimes bigger is better. Imagine this; you are looking for a place to eat, the first thing you check is if the amount is reasonable. Then, you check if the food serving is reasonable based on the prices, most of the time you will base the amount from how big the food serving.

Another is when you are choosing an automobile; you decide based on the amount, design, brand, and whether it a small or big automobile. This is another example of bigger is better.
The last is when we choose to purchase a house; you want to choose a house based on the design, amount and how big it is.

These reasons solidify the concept of bigger is better. However, things change, change is inevitable, people became more critical when choosing things that they buy, especially when it comes to buying a property. People now have an option to live comfortably in a house that is cheaper and smaller.

The idea of living in a small house was reinforced because of the unending fluctuation in the real-estate business. There are a lot of people who have found an alternative housing scheme to help them with their monthly mortgage; it helps them divert the savings they get from their monthly house mortgage to other things. The eagerness of people to look for a livable tiny house brought light to the tiny house movement.

3) Meet the People who Decided to go Tiny

The tiny house movement is a social movement that supports the concept of living in a tiny house and encourages comfortable and economical living. People who have joined this movement have experienced a huge change in their lifestyle.

The tiny house movement has gained its popularity all over the world. People joined this movement for a lot of reasons. Some have decided to join this because of their aspiration to achieve financial freedom, others because of other reasons like being ecologically friendly, can move from one place to the other.

Meet the people who decided to trade a bigger house for a smaller and simple living – and are very much happy with what they did.

Brandon Irwin

Brandon Irwin, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Kansas State University, decided to move from a rental to a tiny house measuring, 360-square foot. For around $40,000, he and his friends built the structure for quite a few months.

“Living in a tiny house has freed up a lot physical and mental energy,” says Irwin. Ten minutes is all it takes for him to clean his whole home and he even shares it with his Australian shepherd, Jimmy.

You can check his tiny house living experience on his blog Earth to Brandon.

Vera Struck

Vera Struck’s tiny house is built on sustainability. Her home which is nicknamed Silver Bullet is composed of 75 percent from reclaimed, repurposed and recycled non-toxic and healthy materials.
What makes Vera’s house the bomb is that it has a solar power, water harvesting systems and a composting and urine-diverting toilet.

As a cancer survivor, she took up the challenge of building, designing and living in a tiny house in 2012. With a total cost of less than 20,000 dollars, she was able to finish the house in two years. Now the house stands on the main floor of 135 square feet.

She has recently garnered the Best Tiny Home Award in Florida’s Tiny House Festival in 2016. Now, she is traveling around the country in her tiny home with more than 15,000 miles covered. She works as an educator and a sustainability advocate.

To her, the tiny house movement is a way for people to take control of their lifestyles.
“Customize your home to your needs,” she says. “Feed your soul.”

Gabriella and Andrew Morrison

After noticing that their family’s dynamics have started eroding, the Morrison family was experiencing a strained and combative time together. “Everyone scattered to opposite corners of the house,” says Gabriella Morrison.

Fascinated by the tiny house movement, the Morrison’s decided to sell their home. Their son went to a boarding school to pursue hockey while the couple together with their daughter went ahead and lived in a pop-up tent trailer on a beach in Mexico.

It was a struggle for the first month. “Then we realized living with the least was the happiest we’d ever been,” says Gabriella.

For more than three years, they have lived in their tiny house that they built in the mountains around Ashland Oregon.

Check out the Morrison’s tiny house in Tiny House Build.

Christian Parsons and Alexis Stephens

Traveling in their 130 square foot house, the bloggers and videographers Alexis Stephens and Christian Parsons are going on adventures and explorations across Canada and U.S.

Stephen states that “this movement is creating more sustainable housing, more meaningful lifestyles and more connected communities.”

Being advocates of simple living, they have created an informative docu-series called “Living Tiny Legally” and records their tiny house adventures on Youtube.

You can check the two on Twitter and Instagram.

Jewel D. Pearson

Despite living in a 360 square feet house, Jewel rocks a walk-in closet, a bathroom that’s comparable to a spa, a balcony of her bedroom and a porch that’s folded-up and screened-in.

“You don’t have to give up luxuries to live in a tiny house,” she says.

After her daughter left for college, she sold her house and turned to tiny house living. She built her future home on a trailer with the help of her sister, a friend, and a general contractor.

Now, she has become a tiny home consultant and advocate going around the country and inspiring others who want to go tiny. You can follow her on her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

4) Types of Tiny Houses

Tiny homes are not only limited to being just regular houses that are downsized. Here we take a look at different tiny home types that works great for any lifestyle.

Bus Conversions

As a popular DIY project, buses are perfect to build your new tiny house. Once all the seats are removed, you will be left with a lot of space that you can use for your home design. A total blank canvas that is waiting for your creative mind to fill.

Before buying a bus, decide first on what you want to put in your home. A bus’ width is consistent, but the length varies with a maximum size of 40’. Buses allow natural light to get inside since the walls are mainly composed of windows. For privacy concerns, simply add a curtain.

Cob Houses

A cob may look like just a small clay hut but, it is more than that. It is a combination of clay, sand, and straw that works perfectly in becoming an all-natural material for your dream house.

Durable and cheap, a cob house that’s taken care of will last a lifetime. In England alone, there are several cob structures that have been standing for over 500 years.

The main key here is to place an overhanging roof that will keep moisture away from the exterior walls. With a strong foundation, a cob house will be safe from elements.

Vardo Tiny Homes

Vardo tiny homes are based on British Romani Wagons that is perfect for a minimalist lifestyle. Traditional vardos were horse-drawn and designed ornately. The inside boasts of wood works and intricate carvings. Modern vardos, however, are towed behind vehicles and has the iconic designs of a bow top and some large frames on their frame’s exteriors.

Having a rounded top, the bed is mostly placed on the wagon’s widest parts. The top’s design is great in minimizing side effects of strong winds.

RVs

It is said that the original tiny houses are RVs. The small living quarters made it possible for being used as a low budget housing and campers even before the tiny house movement trend came to be. If you want to downsize, a standard option is an RV. It is perfect for mobility, and no construction is needed.

There are ready-made RVs available in the market. It is also a good start in seeing if a tiny house suits you. A major drawback in living in an RV is that it’s not designed for cold winters unless you do some serious renovations.

Trailer Homes

Trailer homes are sometimes confused with being the same as an RV. Trailer homes are tiny houses that were constructed on a trailer that’s on the back of a truck. Being the most common tiny home design, trailer homes were the first to gain the attention of the media.

If you want to create a trailer home, you can either hire a contractor or DIY. For cost effectiveness, frames are mostly made from timber. It is chosen for its mobility. If you like living in different sceneries, then this mobile home is excellent for you.

Shipping Containers

As the most mainstream tiny house design, the shipping containers come in different materials. There are even wood shipping containers. What makes these containers great is their feature of being hurricane and fireproof. It is one of the most durable options for starting a tiny home.

You can choose from various sizes. By simply adding windows and porches, you create a tiny home that’s perfect for a simple lifestyle.

These are just some of the many tiny house types in the world. Some make use of yurts, A-frame cabins, and houseboats.

What is a Tiny House Community?

A tiny house community takes the tiny house movement one step further. It is a straightforward concept where tiny houses are brought together in one place that creates a community that shares. Land, time, support, skills and other resources are shared among the people that compose it.
As the tiny house movement gets bigger, so does the need to live a simple and minimalistic life in within a community. All around the world, there are a lot of tiny house communities that you can be a part of.

Trailer Parks: For Mobile Houses

If you are the type of person who wants to jump from one state to the other, and if you have a trailer that you can use, then you can join a tiny house community that is located in a trailer park.
Most of the trailer parks are considered safe. A 2014 study conducted by the criminal justice department of the University of Nevada has found that “trailer park sites showed the lowest rate of violent crime calls for service” when compared to similar non-manufactured dwellings.

Offering a solution to where you can park your mobile tiny house, the Orlando Lakefront at College Park is composed of neighboring tiny houses. There are currently 50 spaces for lease and offers amenities such as a laundromat, fishing dock, and even a boat dock.

Some parks have a fairly strict guideline. In Salem, Oregon, the Sundial Mobile Home Park even provides a detailed instruction on what color residents should paint their homes.

Trailer parks are less common outside the United States and are much less symbolic of a particular lifestyle. It even has a membership to a specific social class. In a recent study by US Census figures, around 6% of the population reside in trailer parks.

Tiny Cottages: For Families who Lost Their Homes

Some tiny house communities are established for Americans who lost their homes. Examples are the Cottages at Oak Park and Anchor Square that was developed after Hurricane Katrina.

Anchor Square is located at Pascagoula and is composed of 16 pastel-colored cottages. Its community was built through partnerships among the city – the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce, Habitat for Humanity, the Gulf Coast Community Foundation, the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, and the Mississippi Main Street Association. Some small business owners have opened up their shops in this area because of the low rent, sense of community and positive marketing.

On the other hand, Oak Park boasts of 30 cottage-style homes which were built to withstand wind storms with at least 140 mph speed. The park has one bedroom to three bedroom houses with $600 starting rent.

“I think there is an opportunity for places hit with a disaster to have something nice created as an aftereffect,” said Joe Cloyd, Oak Park’s private sector developer.

Tiny Homes: For Homeless Veterans

Other tiny house communities are being built for homeless veterans. A study in January 2016 has found out that there are 39,471 homeless veterans identified by communities across America.

One organization named Veterans Place took up the challenge of Tiny Homes Project where they build an affordable housing for homeless veterans. The tiny home’s site consists of 15 homes with energy efficiency upgrades. A shared community garden, a pavilion, a pond and even a walking trail will be built for the community.
If you are interested in helping, you can donate at the Veteran’s Place.

Tiny Village: For Alpaca Lovers

In Las Vegas, there is a tiny house community called Airstream Village. It is Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos and internet entrepreneur, reside together with his alpacas named Triton and Marley.

The village consists of 30 Airstream trailers and Tumbleweed Houses by Tumbleweed Tiny House Company. Most of the tenants here are young professionals and visiting techies. Rent is at $1,200 which includes Wi-Fi and essential utilities.
We can see that there are different types of communities that cater to various types of people. Now let’s delve into the reasons why a lot of people prefer living in tiny house communities.

Why Living in a Community is Better

In a tiny house community, you do not just share the land where you place your houses, but other things. Let us look at it from a deeper perspective.

1) You share your time.

The tiny house owners share each other’s time. As a community, you also need to devote a little of your time to make necessary enhancements in your common place.

2) You share your skills.

A tiny house community is just likened to a typical small community. You know each other, your skills will be useful for other people, and the skills of other homeowners will be beneficial for you too.

3) You share your resources.

Like usual houses, tiny houses would need repairs and upgrades too. Your tiny house carpentry skills may be helpful for other members of the community.

4) You share your support.

To have a successful and harmonious relationship in a community, you need to also support each other. This is another important aspect of joining a tiny house community, you do not live alone, you do not go through problems alone, but you became an integral part of the success of your community.

Why People Like Living in Tiny House Communities

Tiny houses are now everywhere. Every year, new houses are built. The media is going crazy over these tiny homes. There are numerous blogs and TV shows. We have the Tiny House, Big Living, Tiny House Nation, and so much more.

Especially with the current cost of having a “normal house,” tiny houses not only offers cost effectiveness but a lot more! There’s the traveling perks, and economical living just to me a few.
Here we’ll go over some of the benefits of living in a tiny house community.

Lower Cost of Living

One the major advantages of living in a tiny house community are enjoying a lower cost of living. Most people dream of financial freedom. However, one of the most significant problems that we face is the steady increase in our cost of living.

This is the central concept behind going tiny, saving a bigger chunk of money from your property mortgage. Aside from that, your lifestyle philosophies change, you become more critical of the things that you need to buy, from the things that you want to buy. On your own, it can be hard to achieve this; but being a part of a tiny house community enables you to get the support that you need.

Seeing others live a simple and minimalistic life will inspire you to reach what your neighbors have attained so far. Tiny house communities established around the world has given people the chance to save and create their own houses.

Delta Bay Tiny House Resort is one example of a tiny house community in North Carolina that provides individuals the chance to live tiny and experience a lower cost of living. The community is RVIA compliant and composed of tiny houses and parked RVs. If you have a mobile house or an RV, you are welcome to park here.

Because tiny houses are small, your house’s required energy use smaller compared to standard homes. Your electric bill will be lesser than your traditional house’s bill. If not, you can just use solar power to produce your house’s needed energy.

In Eugene, Oregon, a small tiny house village, Opportunity Village has portable solar systems that help with the basic necessities of the homeless people that reside here. The main goal of the community is to provide homeless people with their basic necessities and help them get back on their feet.

The entire community has operating costs at an estimated $1,800 per month. But with the addition of the solar panels, the bills are further reduced.

Less Cleaning and More Family Time

What is the common problem when you have a big house? The answer is – time, effort and money in the maintenance and cleanliness of your property. In cleaning, you have two options, either do it all by yourself, or you can pay cleaning professionals, but that means an added expense.

When you live in a tiny house, you have less space to clean. Tiny homes range from as small as 80 square feet (7.4 square meters) to 400 square feet (37 square meters).

One couple, Kim and Raul, decided to move their family of five to a tiny house. In their new 365 square feet house, the kids share a room, and the limited space has led the family to be extremely organized. The kids are forced to clean their toys because of the small area.

According to the family, living in a smaller space has given them less space to go to when you’re angry. “There’s no room for anger in a Tiny House. You don’t have anywhere to go to be mad.” Said Raul.

The smaller area has led the kids to learn to share their belongings, space and even get along. Their son Jackson who is now 11 said, “We play together more now, and we have more family time.”

Build Relationships

The tiny house community is mostly composed of less than 50 houses. This helps you get the opportunity to build better relationships with the other homeowners. Gone are the days when you would know your neighbors by face, but not by name.

The Village of Wildflowers in North Carolina even fosters a community that grows organically where residents can decide on activities that they want to participate in. Some activities include regular meetups for potluck dinners, fire pit nights, game night, brewery trips and sign language classes.

Room To Grow

Since a tiny house occupies a lesser lot area, you’ll have a wider backyard or front yard. Whichever you prefer. The additional outdoor space can be used for some gardening and grow some food. In doing so, you get fresh food and lesser food expenses.

In Georgia, the Green Bridge Farm tiny house community boasts of a 25 acre of wooded area. The community has a gardening project that provides homeowners the opportunity to grow their own food. The neighborhood association is responsible for maintaining the gardens.

Disadvantages of Living in a Tiny House Community

Before you get all excited and start selling your stuff, move in a tiny house, and join a tiny house community, you need to assess your current lifestyle, and if you can cope with living tiny. You should not just look at benefits of being a part of a tiny house community, check its disadvantages too.

By knowing the possible disadvantages, you are preparing yourself for what’s to come. Tiny houses aren’t always rainbows and sunshine. You have to sacrifice some things and get used to living small. Understanding the disadvantages is just as important as knowing the benefits.

Without further ado, here are the disadvantages of living in a tiny house community.

Finding a Location is Hard

One of the challenges that tiny house communities face is the difficulty in looking for a suitable location where the community can be started. Most of the time, the location might be on the outskirts of a city, proving to be far from the main city district. It means that you need to drive further to get certain supplies that your community needs or drive every day to go to work.

Kelvin Young, a developer and founder of KEYO Tiny House, planned to build a tiny house community in Charlotte, North Carolina. The idea was great an all, but the community members of the place were against the project. They went to the City Council and attempted to stop the development in fear of having their houses’ property values drop. Compared to Young’s tiny houses costing $89,000, the city’s home price is at $190,000 on average.

The same thing happened in San Jose, California where a tiny house community was supposed to be built. Residents were concerned with how it would affect their property’s value. As such, the San Jose officials implemented restrictions. The tiny home community should be 150 feet away from schools and parks and at least 100 feet away from creeks and existing homes.

Building Codes and Laws

One of the pressing issues that tiny house communities face is abiding by the building codes or habitual structure laws. You need to follow certain guidelines to get the approval when building a tiny house. You can use your land to be the host of the community, but remember that the houses to be built on your land should still follow the building code in your municipality.

Psychological Effects

This might be a problem for people who are considered introvert or have claustrophobia. Changing your lifestyle is not automatic, it takes time. So if you are planning to join a tiny house community, you need to ask yourself, or any member of your family if they are ready to accept, and face sudden lifestyle changes.

Susan Saegert, an environmental psychology professor in CUNY, has studied that in tight spaces, the lack of privacy in a child’s home can lead them to become withdrawn and even have trouble concentrating and studying.

A house has to fill in some psychological needs such as relaxation and self-expression which may not be met easily in a cramped space.

Now that you have the advantages and disadvantages of living in a tiny house community, you need to weigh in all these aspects properly. It will never be a twenty-four-hour decision. It takes days or even months to plan, and prepare for the changes that will happen in your lifestyle.

Tiny House Communities Around the World

Are you planning on joining a tiny house community? You are well decided to take on a new chapter in your life in a tiny house community, but the problem is you do not want to settle down in your country. You want to live your life in a totality foreign place.

Fret not, did you know that there are a lot of countries supporting the tiny house movement? Some countries are now slowly embracing the tiny house community concept. Let us take on the journey and get to know more about these countries.

Here are some tiny house communities in Asia:

MBS House

Green Man Tiny House

Tiny House Thailand

Tiny House Communities in Europe

There are tiny house enthusiasts in the United Kingdom who are now starting to embrace and encourage individuals to consider being part of the Tiny House Village in the UK. There are documentaries found on Netflix such as We the Tiny House People; Tiny; Small is Beautiful; and Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things, as well as Glamping experiences in tiny houses. There is also the Tiny House UK who builds tiny houses around the UK.

The interest of these documentaries and company is focused mainly on two things. First is to be able to live in a cheap house that they can call their own. Second is to be able to support an eco-friendly and minimalistic lifestyle.

A village named KODA Village in Tallinn, Estonia was recently built by the Kodasema company. It is composed of seven KODA homes and has won a Landscape Architecture and Urban Design.

Each house is 25 square meters. What makes these KODA houses unique is that they are mobile houses made of concrete that doesn’t need any foundation and can be easily relocated.

Kodasema is currently working on building other small villages focusing on Estonia, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, London, England, Almere, and Holland.

Here are some tiny house communities in Europe:

Tiny Eco Homes UK

Tiny House Community

Tiny House UK

Tiny Wunder House

Tiny Houses

Small House Bliss

Madi Home

Leonardo

Dome Living

Tiny House Scotland

Tiny House Ukraine

Tiny House Kultur

Tiny House Communities in Canada

Another nation that highly supports the tiny house community is Canada. Just imagine the magnificent view that you get every time you wake up in these tiny house communities in Canada. Aside from that, you get to save on the high cost of purchasing bigger properties in Canada.

There are tiny house communities already built in Canada. You can check on the “tiny town” in Toronto. This tiny house community is a collection of adorable tiny homes and a tight-knit community. It is located at Craven Road and is a considered as a small living haven. Each house is measured lower than 500 square feet and built in different styles.

What makes this town so loved is that “some strange force exists between the people who live on Craven Road, holding them together, as though the fact they all live in similar sized houses makes them more than just neighbors, but instant friends.”,as stated by Spacing Toronto.

We also have the Lake of the Woods Tiny Home Village in Keewatin, Ontario. This village is composed of ten tiny houses and five hamlets. It has a land area of 50 acres and is near the Winnipeg River. The residents grow their own food and live a sustainable life.

Here are some tiny house communities in Canada:

Red Door Tiny Home 

Serenity Acres

Black Bird Tiny Homes

Tiny Home Alliance

Finished Right

Tiny Homes Canada
BC Tiny House
Humming Bird Micro Homes

Summit Tiny Homes

The Tiny House Festival
Tiny House Ontario

Rewind Homes 

Square one

Wheat Grass Tiny Home Community

Tiny House Communities in Australia

Do want to start a new life in the Land Down Under? Are you thrilled to wake up each morning near the Gold Coast, or experience the life with nature? Then consider moving to a tiny house community in Australia.

Australia has been known not just on with its rich ecosystem, but with functional houses and structures. The innovation in the building industry and the tiny house movement has paved the way for different tiny house communities in Australia.

The amazing and creative tiny house designs and the enchanting environment proves to be a wonderful place to build a tiny house community. There is the Tiny House Villages that aims at building tiny house communities around Australia. Currently, they are getting the approval of the Council to establish a display site of tiny houses in Melbourne. This project will be the country’s first display on tiny houses and plans to feature various tiny house manufacturers.

The eco-village of Wurruk’an is one of the tiny house communities in Australia. The emerging village is established in Gippsland, Victoria just outside of Moe. It is composed of a 20-acre property that seeks to provide a community for people who plan on living life in a simpler way and exploring alternatives to consumer capitalism. You can check out Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity which documents the village’s first year as a community.

Here are some tiny house communities in Australia:

Tiny House Village

Tiny

Tiny Home Rolling Pasture

Tiny House Communities in the United States of America

America has more than a dozen tiny house communities spread out in the country. The popularity of the tiny house movement brought to light for the emergence of the tiny house communities. The Sanctuary Minnesota Village is one example of a tiny house community. It is a pint-sized and offers homeowners to park, live and lease a tiny house for a minimum of six months. They even have available couple homes for rent.

LuxTiny, a custom home builder is developing a community in Arizona’s the White Mountains. It is the first in the area and consists of 45 spaces on six acres. If interested, you can buy a house starting at $64,900 or rent for around $800 a month. If you love a wide green space, the community features an accessible 19,000 square feet walking space.

In the country, tiny house communities are slowly booming. You can check these 15 options of tiny house communities compiled by Tiny House, Huge Ideas that are situated in America.

Also, Tiny House Talk created a list of tiny house communities that you can refer to when searching for a community.

What is a Tiny House Community?

A tiny house community takes the tiny house movement one step further. It is a straightforward concept where tiny houses are brought together in one place that creates a community that shares. Land, time, support, skills and other resources are shared among the people that compose it.
As the tiny house movement gets bigger, so does the need to live a simple and minimalistic life in within a community. All around the world, there are a lot of tiny house communities that you can be a part of.

1) Trailer Parks: For Mobile Houses

If you are the type of person who wants to jump from one state to the other, and if you have a trailer that you can use, then you can join a tiny house community that is located in a trailer park.
Most of the trailer parks are considered safe. A 2014 study conducted by the criminal justice department of the University of Nevada has found that “trailer park sites showed the lowest rate of violent crime calls for service” when compared to similar non-manufactured dwellings.

Offering a solution to where you can park your mobile tiny house, the Orlando Lakefront at College Park is composed of neighboring tiny houses. There are currently 50 spaces for lease and offers amenities such as a laundromat, fishing dock, and even a boat dock.

Some parks have a fairly strict guideline. In Salem, Oregon, the Sundial Mobile Home Park even provides a detailed instruction on what color residents should paint their homes.

Trailer parks are less common outside the United States and are much less symbolic of a particular lifestyle. It even has a membership to a specific social class. In a recent study by US Census figures, around 6% of the population reside in trailer parks.

Tiny Cottages: For Families who Lost Their Homes

Some tiny house communities are established for Americans who lost their homes. Examples are the Cottages at Oak Park and Anchor Square that was developed after Hurricane Katrina.

Anchor Square is located at Pascagoula and is composed of 16 pastel-colored cottages. Its community was built through partnerships among the city – the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce, Habitat for Humanity, the Gulf Coast Community Foundation, the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency, and the Mississippi Main Street Association. Some small business owners have opened up their shops in this area because of the low rent, sense of community and positive marketing.

On the other hand, Oak Park boasts of 30 cottage-style homes which were built to withstand wind storms with at least 140 mph speed. The park has one bedroom to three bedroom houses with $600 starting rent.

“I think there is an opportunity for places hit with a disaster to have something nice created as an aftereffect,” said Joe Cloyd, Oak Park’s private sector developer.

Tiny Homes: For Homeless Veterans

Other tiny house communities are being built for homeless veterans. A study in January 2016 has found out that there are 39,471 homeless veterans identified by communities across America.

One organization named Veterans Place took up the challenge of Tiny Homes Project where they build an affordable housing for homeless veterans. The tiny home’s site consists of 15 homes with energy efficiency upgrades. A shared community garden, a pavilion, a pond and even a walking trail will be built for the community.
If you are interested in helping, you can donate at the Veteran’s Place.

Tiny Village: For Alpaca Lovers

In Las Vegas, there is a tiny house community called Airstream Village. It is Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos and internet entrepreneur, reside together with his alpacas named Triton and Marley.

The village consists of 30 Airstream trailers and Tumbleweed Houses by Tumbleweed Tiny House Company. Most of the tenants here are young professionals and visiting techies. Rent is at $1,200 which includes Wi-Fi and essential utilities.
We can see that there are different types of communities that cater to various types of people. Now let’s delve into the reasons why a lot of people prefer living in tiny house communities.

Why Living in a Community is Better

In a tiny house community, you do not just share the land where you place your houses, but other things. Let us look at it from a deeper perspective.

1) You share your time.

The tiny house owners share each other’s time. As a community, you also need to devote a little of your time to make necessary enhancements in your common place.

2) You share your skills.

A tiny house community is just likened to a typical small community. You know each other, your skills will be useful for other people, and the skills of other homeowners will be beneficial for you too.

3) You share your resources.

Like usual houses, tiny houses would need repairs and upgrades too. Your tiny house carpentry skills may be helpful for other members of the community.

4) You share your support.

To have a successful and harmonious relationship in a community, you need to also support each other. This is another important aspect of joining a tiny house community, you do not live alone, you do not go through problems alone, but you became an integral part of the success of your community.

Why People Like Living in Tiny House Communities

Tiny houses are now everywhere. Every year, new houses are built. The media is going crazy over these tiny homes. There are numerous blogs and TV shows. We have the Tiny House, Big Living, Tiny House Nation, and so much more.

Especially with the current cost of having a “normal house,” tiny houses not only offers cost effectiveness but a lot more! There’s the traveling perks, and economical living just to me a few.
Here we’ll go over some of the benefits of living in a tiny house community.

Lower Cost of Living

One the major advantages of living in a tiny house community are enjoying a lower cost of living. Most people dream of financial freedom. However, one of the most significant problems that we face is the steady increase in our cost of living.

This is the central concept behind going tiny, saving a bigger chunk of money from your property mortgage. Aside from that, your lifestyle philosophies change, you become more critical of the things that you need to buy, from the things that you want to buy. On your own, it can be hard to achieve this; but being a part of a tiny house community enables you to get the support that you need.

Seeing others live a simple and minimalistic life will inspire you to reach what your neighbors have attained so far. Tiny house communities established around the world has given people the chance to save and create their own houses.

Delta Bay Tiny House Resort is one example of a tiny house community in North Carolina that provides individuals the chance to live tiny and experience a lower cost of living. The community is RVIA compliant and composed of tiny houses and parked RVs. If you have a mobile house or an RV, you are welcome to park here.

Because tiny houses are small, your house’s required energy use smaller compared to standard homes. Your electric bill will be lesser than your traditional house’s bill. If not, you can just use solar power to produce your house’s needed energy.

In Eugene, Oregon, a small tiny house village, Opportunity Village has portable solar systems that help with the basic necessities of the homeless people that reside here. The main goal of the community is to provide homeless people with their basic necessities and help them get back on their feet.

The entire community has operating costs at an estimated $1,800 per month. But with the addition of the solar panels, the bills are further reduced.

Less Cleaning and More Family Time

What is the common problem when you have a big house? The answer is – time, effort and money in the maintenance and cleanliness of your property. In cleaning, you have two options, either do it all by yourself, or you can pay cleaning professionals, but that means an added expense.

When you live in a tiny house, you have less space to clean. Tiny homes range from as small as 80 square feet (7.4 square meters) to 400 square feet (37 square meters).

One couple, Kim and Raul, decided to move their family of five to a tiny house. In their new 365 square feet house, the kids share a room, and the limited space has led the family to be extremely organized. The kids are forced to clean their toys because of the small area.

According to the family, living in a smaller space has given them less space to go to when you’re angry. “There’s no room for anger in a Tiny House. You don’t have anywhere to go to be mad.” Said Raul.

The smaller area has led the kids to learn to share their belongings, space and even get along. Their son Jackson who is now 11 said, “We play together more now, and we have more family time.”

Build Relationships

The tiny house community is mostly composed of less than 50 houses. This helps you get the opportunity to build better relationships with the other homeowners. Gone are the days when you would know your neighbors by face, but not by name.

The Village of Wildflowers in North Carolina even fosters a community that grows organically where residents can decide on activities that they want to participate in. Some activities include regular meetups for potluck dinners, fire pit nights, game night, brewery trips and sign language classes.

Room To Grow

Since a tiny house occupies a lesser lot area, you’ll have a wider backyard or front yard. Whichever you prefer. The additional outdoor space can be used for some gardening and grow some food. In doing so, you get fresh food and lesser food expenses.

In Georgia, the Green Bridge Farm tiny house community boasts of a 25 acre of wooded area. The community has a gardening project that provides homeowners the opportunity to grow their own food. The neighborhood association is responsible for maintaining the gardens.

Disadvantages of Living in a Tiny House Community

Before you get all excited and start selling your stuff, move in a tiny house, and join a tiny house community, you need to assess your current lifestyle, and if you can cope with living tiny. You should not just look at benefits of being a part of a tiny house community, check its disadvantages too.

By knowing the possible disadvantages, you are preparing yourself for what’s to come. Tiny houses aren’t always rainbows and sunshine. You have to sacrifice some things and get used to living small. Understanding the disadvantages is just as important as knowing the benefits.

Without further ado, here are the disadvantages of living in a tiny house community.

Finding a Location is Hard

One of the challenges that tiny house communities face is the difficulty in looking for a suitable location where the community can be started. Most of the time, the location might be on the outskirts of a city, proving to be far from the main city district. It means that you need to drive further to get certain supplies that your community needs or drive every day to go to work.

Kelvin Young, a developer and founder of KEYO Tiny House, planned to build a tiny house community in Charlotte, North Carolina. The idea was great an all, but the community members of the place were against the project. They went to the City Council and attempted to stop the development in fear of having their houses’ property values drop. Compared to Young’s tiny houses costing $89,000, the city’s home price is at $190,000 on average.

The same thing happened in San Jose, California where a tiny house community was supposed to be built. Residents were concerned with how it would affect their property’s value. As such, the San Jose officials implemented restrictions. The tiny home community should be 150 feet away from schools and parks and at least 100 feet away from creeks and existing homes.

Building Codes and Laws

One of the pressing issues that tiny house communities face is abiding by the building codes or habitual structure laws. You need to follow certain guidelines to get the approval when building a tiny house. You can use your land to be the host of the community, but remember that the houses to be built on your land should still follow the building code in your municipality.

Psychological Effects

This might be a problem for people who are considered introvert or have claustrophobia. Changing your lifestyle is not automatic, it takes time. So if you are planning to join a tiny house community, you need to ask yourself, or any member of your family if they are ready to accept, and face sudden lifestyle changes.

Susan Saegert, an environmental psychology professor in CUNY, has studied that in tight spaces, the lack of privacy in a child’s home can lead them to become withdrawn and even have trouble concentrating and studying.

A house has to fill in some psychological needs such as relaxation and self-expression which may not be met easily in a cramped space.

Now that you have the advantages and disadvantages of living in a tiny house community, you need to weigh in all these aspects properly. It will never be a twenty-four-hour decision. It takes days or even months to plan, and prepare for the changes that will happen in your lifestyle.

Tiny House Communities Around the World

Are you planning on joining a tiny house community? You are well decided to take on a new chapter in your life in a tiny house community, but the problem is you do not want to settle down in your country. You want to live your life in a totality foreign place.

Fret not, did you know that there are a lot of countries supporting the tiny house movement? Some countries are now slowly embracing the tiny house community concept. Let us take on the journey and get to know more about these countries.

Here are some tiny house communities in Australia:

MBS House

Green Man Tiny House

Tiny House Thailand

Tiny House Communities in Europe

There are tiny house enthusiasts in the United Kingdom who are now starting to embrace and encourage individuals to consider being part of the Tiny House Village in the UK. There are documentaries found on Netflix such as We the Tiny House People; Tiny; Small is Beautiful; and Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things, as well as Glamping experiences in tiny houses. There is also the Tiny House UK who builds tiny houses around the UK.

The interest of these documentaries and company is focused mainly on two things. First is to be able to live in a cheap house that they can call their own. Second is to be able to support an eco-friendly and minimalistic lifestyle.

A village named KODA Village in Tallinn, Estonia was recently built by the Kodasema company. It is composed of seven KODA homes and has won a Landscape Architecture and Urban Design.

Each house is 25 square meters. What makes these KODA houses unique is that they are mobile houses made of concrete that doesn’t need any foundation and can be easily relocated.

Kodasema is currently working on building other small villages focusing on Estonia, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, London, England, Almere, and Holland.

Here are some tiny house communities in Europe:

Tiny Eco Homes UK

Tiny House Community

Tiny House UK

Tiny Wunder House

Tiny Houses

Small House Bliss

Madi Home

Leonardo

Dome Living

Tiny House Scotland

Tiny House Ukraine

Tiny House Kultur

Tiny House Communities in Canada

Another nation that highly supports the tiny house community is Canada. Just imagine the magnificent view that you get every time you wake up in these tiny house communities in Canada. Aside from that, you get to save on the high cost of purchasing bigger properties in Canada.

There are tiny house communities already built in Canada. You can check on the “tiny town” in Toronto. This tiny house community is a collection of adorable tiny homes and a tight-knit community. It is located at Craven Road and is a considered as a small living haven. Each house is measured lower than 500 square feet and built in different styles.

What makes this town so loved is that “some strange force exists between the people who live on Craven Road, holding them together, as though the fact they all live in similar sized houses makes them more than just neighbors, but instant friends.”,as stated by Spacing Toronto.

We also have the Lake of the Woods Tiny Home Village in Keewatin, Ontario. This village is composed of ten tiny houses and five hamlets. It has a land area of 50 acres and is near the Winnipeg River. The residents grow their own food and live a sustainable life.

Here are some tiny house communities in Canada:

Red Door Tiny Home 

Serenity Acres

Black Bird Tiny Homes

Tiny Home Alliance

Finished Right

Tiny Homes Canada
BC Tiny House
Humming Bird Micro Homes

Summit Tiny Homes

The Tiny House Festival
Tiny House Ontario

Rewind Homes 

Square one

Wheat Grass Tiny Home Community

Tiny House Communities in Australia

Do want to start a new life in the Land Down Under? Are you thrilled to wake up each morning near the Gold Coast, or experience the life with nature? Then consider moving to a tiny house community in Australia.

Australia has been known not just on with its rich ecosystem, but with functional houses and structures. The innovation in the building industry and the tiny house movement has paved the way for different tiny house communities in Australia.

The amazing and creative tiny house designs and the enchanting environment proves to be a wonderful place to build a tiny house community. There is the Tiny House Villages that aims at building tiny house communities around Australia. Currently, they are getting the approval of the Council to establish a display site of tiny houses in Melbourne. This project will be the country’s first display on tiny houses and plans to feature various tiny house manufacturers.

The eco-village of Wurruk’an is one of the tiny house communities in Australia. The emerging village is established in Gippsland, Victoria just outside of Moe. It is composed of a 20-acre property that seeks to provide a community for people who plan on living life in a simpler way and exploring alternatives to consumer capitalism. You can check out Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity which documents the village’s first year as a community.

Here are some tiny house communities in Asia:

Tiny House Village

Tiny

Tiny Home Rolling Pasture

Tiny House Communities in the United States of America

America has more than a dozen tiny house communities spread out in the country. The popularity of the tiny house movement brought to light for the emergence of the tiny house communities. The Sanctuary Minnesota Village is one example of a tiny house community. It is a pint-sized and offers homeowners to park, live and lease a tiny house for a minimum of six months. They even have available couple homes for rent.

LuxTiny, a custom home builder is developing a community in Arizona’s the White Mountains. It is the first in the area and consists of 45 spaces on six acres. If interested, you can buy a house starting at $64,900 or rent for around $800 a month. If you love a wide green space, the community features an accessible 19,000 square feet walking space.

In the country, tiny house communities are slowly booming. You can check these 15 options of tiny house communities compiled by Tiny House, Huge Ideas that are situated in America.

Also, Tiny House Talk created a list of tiny house communities that you can refer to when searching for a community.

TOPIC THREE: STARTING YOUR TINY HOUSE COMMUNITY

TOPIC THREE: STARTING YOUR TINY HOUSE COMMUNITY

As much as there are a lot of people who want to start living in tiny houses, there are also tons of people who want to build a tiny house community but don’t know where and how to do it. A tiny house community can be daunting to start. To help you, let’s get some tips from the people who have successfully created and became a part of a tiny house community.
As much as there are a lot of people who want to start living in tiny houses, there are also tons of people who want to build a tiny house community but don’t know where and how to do it. A tiny house community can be daunting to start. To help you, let’s get some tips from the people who have successfully created and became a part of a tiny house community.

Tiny House Community Starters

1) Lina Menard

In Portland, Oregon, Lina Menard, a tiny house consultant, and designer, became a part of the Simply Home Community. Here she contributed to the start of a community that is considered to be the first tiny house community in America.

The Simply Home Community started when she and some other tiny house enthusiasts wanted a place that they can legally share resources and space. Among them, one found an oversized lot with an existing home. From there, three people reside in the big house while the other four built their little houses that work as a “detached bedroom” of the big house.

Each one of them has access to the dining room, living room, laundry, bathroom guestroom and kitchen in the big house. Everyone shares his or her own resources and responsibilities, even share chores and some purchasing.

In other words, the people living in the community do not live independently in their tiny houses, but they live in the property. They live in the community. Simply Home Community is a cohousing type and to make that work each of the community members shares values and shared commitment.

2) Timothy Ransom

Timothy Ransom, the president of Panza and the one behind Quixote Village, stated that they were able to start the tiny house project by building a constituency with the help of volunteers who would support the political work and fundraising for the first tiny house community for the homeless.

“Take the time to build a constituency based on shared values and mission, and make sure that decision-makers and those with resources are included. It takes a village to build a Village.”, advice Ransom for people who want to create a tiny house village.

3) Chelsea Rustrum

On the other hand, community builder Chelsea Rustrum advises that to start a tiny house community project you should have a vision of what you want to create then look for some land, talk to a lot of people such as city and building planners, also environmental health people.

“Have a financial model in addition to a vision,” Rustum said.

Before we move any further in creating your community of tiny house owners, it is vital that you understand several key factors when building your tiny house community, or tiny house village.

Find a Suitable Location

The first consideration would be a location where you can start your tiny house community or tiny house village project. There are different states where you can find a big land area where you can start your tiny house community project.

Claude Trepanier, a social enterprise and director of development at Habitat Multi Générations which builds tiny house projects in Quebec, stated that when it comes to location, first “identify a suitable land area with zoning suitable for small house construction.” Afterward check what a successful tiny house community needs such as affordable land area, drinkable water supply, common infrastructure, road and wastewater disposal.

Find out About the Building Guidelines and Laws.

Different states have different zoning guidelines and codes that you need to consider. Get information about the access roads, environmental laws, and even environmental health guidelines. Aside from the land usage laws, you need to also get a full understanding of the architectural guidelines. This will help you move on to your project proposal stage.

“Get on the ground and talk to regulatory individuals in the planning and building departments about what you plan to do and the best way to get it done.”, says the community builder Chelsea Rustum.

Starting a tiny house community can be hard. You have to talk to a lot of people and make sure your purpose is clear.

“Changes to zoning must go through an approval and request process, which requires the notification of the neighbors, who can prevent changes from going through due to their interest in property values, noise, etc,” Rustum added.

Project Proposal

Your tiny house community project should come with a project proposal which includes the design and the total number of houses, a properly laid out electricity, water, and sewer system. Another key aspect of your project proposal should be your bylaws as a community. It will help the local officials have a better understanding of why you are building a tiny house community.

You can present a project that helps out the homeless. You can conceptualize a place where retirees can come together and build a tiny retirement house community. You can even go as bold as you want and build a tiny beach house community. There are a lot of possibilities; you just have to be steadfast in your vision in creating a sustainable tiny home community.

Trepanier advises that when working with the regulators and local officials “show success stories in similar municipalities.”

To help you start your project proposal, you can check similar tiny house communities to serve as models for your project.

For tiny house communities for the homeless, you can check Dignity Village in NE Portland. The village provides shelter and housing for 60 homeless people.

Another fantastic community is OM Village in Madison. The organization behind the village is Occupy Madison, Inc. which has several projects including the OM Build for building tiny houses, OMG Goods for selling products to fundraise to build homes, and OM village the tiny house village for the homeless.

You can also check SquareOne, a non-profit organization dedicated to building tiny homes for people in need of housing.

On the other hand, for a more urban design with outdoor space and entertainment areas, we have
Airstream Park where the Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh lives. It is a community composed of 30 trailers and tiny homes.

Lemon Cove Village is also an amazing community to check. It is an RV Park surrounded by spectacular scenery including rocks, mountains, oak trees and fresh air. It is located in the foothills of the western Sierra Nevada mountain range and near the entrance of the Sequoia National Park and Kings Canyon National Park.

Project Sponsors and Funding

Starting a tiny house community is expensive. All the permits, project layouts, and tiny house buildouts can be costly. If you already have a group of tiny house owners, ask each one of them if they are amenable to sharing the initial cost of building your tiny house community.

If not, you would need to do some advertising and funding to support the different stages of your community buildout. Look for sponsors that can help provide materials in building the houses. You have to look for companies who can provide affordable tiny house kits or DIY tiny house kits. Show them that you are serious and align your community with a ‘brand’ that they can relate.

Another way to raise funds is through crowdfunding. Tiny House Big Solution created an outline for creating a successful crowdfunding campaign. You can choose from the top 20 crowdfunding platforms to start your crowdfunding journey.

Another recommendation from Rustum that you can do aside from crowdfunding is “To find as few funders as needed that are in alignment with the village, but do not intend to live there.”
On the other hand, Trepanier suggests “pre-sales and community bonds.”

Sustainable Living

A key factor in a successful tiny house community is knowing how to support and enhance sustainable living after the houses are built.

Aside from the vision, you have to create a financial model that looks like a business plan in the end.
As Rustum said, “Once you have an idea of the parcels of land that are the closest financial and zoning fit for your village, do some visual modeling on the village, which you can use as designs to articulate what you intend to build.”

You have to understand your model and how it affects the sustainability of the village. In addition to this, build a community of people who are interested and want to help. Treat it as a project that you do for the love of it and as a business with a financial plan that is sustainable enough to get the village off the ground.

Furthermore, don’t ignore the community building side. Create a meetup group, a website, Google group for document sharing or a Facebook group for the article and social sharing. A great tool to try is Neighborland. It helps you in finding interested people within your city that can contribute ideas that help improve the area.

Tiny House Community Starters

1) Lina Menard

In Portland, Oregon, Lina Menard, a tiny house consultant, and designer, became a part of the Simply Home Community. Here she contributed to the start of a community that is considered to be the first tiny house community in America.

The Simply Home Community started when she and some other tiny house enthusiasts wanted a place that they can legally share resources and space. Among them, one found an oversized lot with an existing home. From there, three people reside in the big house while the other four built their little houses that work as a “detached bedroom” of the big house.

Each one of them has access to the dining room, living room, laundry, bathroom guestroom and kitchen in the big house. Everyone shares his or her own resources and responsibilities, even share chores and some purchasing.

In other words, the people living in the community do not live independently in their tiny houses, but they live in the property. They live in the community. Simply Home Community is a cohousing type and to make that work each of the community members shares values and shared commitment.

2) Timothy Ransom

Timothy Ransom, the president of Panza and the one behind Quixote Village, stated that they were able to start the tiny house project by building a constituency with the help of volunteers who would support the political work and fundraising for the first tiny house community for the homeless.

“Take the time to build a constituency based on shared values and mission, and make sure that decision-makers and those with resources are included. It takes a village to build a Village.”, advice Ransom for people who want to create a tiny house village.

3) Chelsea Rustrum
On the other hand, community builder Chelsea Rustrum advises that to start a tiny house community project you should have a vision of what you want to create then look for some land, talk to a lot of people such as city and building planners, also environmental health people.

“Have a financial model in addition to a vision,” Rustum said.

Before we move any further in creating your community of tiny house owners, it is vital that you understand several key factors when building your tiny house community, or tiny house village.

Find a Suitable Location

The first consideration would be a location where you can start your tiny house community or tiny house village project. There are different states where you can find a big land area where you can start your tiny house community project.

Claude Trepanier, a social enterprise and director of development at Habitat Multi Générations which builds tiny house projects in Quebec, stated that when it comes to location, first “identify a suitable land area with zoning suitable for small house construction.” Afterward check what a successful tiny house community needs such as affordable land area, drinkable water supply, common infrastructure, road and wastewater disposal.

Find out About the Building Guidelines and Laws.

Different states have different zoning guidelines and codes that you need to consider. Get information about the access roads, environmental laws, and even environmental health guidelines. Aside from the land usage laws, you need to also get a full understanding of the architectural guidelines. This will help you move on to your project proposal stage.

“Get on the ground and talk to regulatory individuals in the planning and building departments about what you plan to do and the best way to get it done.”, says the community builder Chelsea Rustum.

Starting a tiny house community can be hard. You have to talk to a lot of people and make sure your purpose is clear.

“Changes to zoning must go through an approval and request process, which requires the notification of the neighbors, who can prevent changes from going through due to their interest in property values, noise, etc,” Rustum added.

Project Proposal

Your tiny house community project should come with a project proposal which includes the design and the total number of houses, a properly laid out electricity, water, and sewer system. Another key aspect of your project proposal should be your bylaws as a community. It will help the local officials have a better understanding of why you are building a tiny house community.

You can present a project that helps out the homeless. You can conceptualize a place where retirees can come together and build a tiny retirement house community. You can even go as bold as you want and build a tiny beach house community. There are a lot of possibilities; you just have to be steadfast in your vision in creating a sustainable tiny home community.

Trepanier advises that when working with the regulators and local officials “show success stories in similar municipalities.”

To help you start your project proposal, you can check similar tiny house communities to serve as models for your project.

For tiny house communities for the homeless, you can check Dignity Village in NE Portland. The village provides shelter and housing for 60 homeless people.

Another fantastic community is OM Village in Madison. The organization behind the village is Occupy Madison, Inc. which has several projects including the OM Build for building tiny houses, OMG Goods for selling products to fundraise to build homes, and OM village the tiny house village for the homeless.

You can also check SquareOne, a non-profit organization dedicated to building tiny homes for people in need of housing.

On the other hand, for a more urban design with outdoor space and entertainment areas, we have
Airstream Park where the Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh lives. It is a community composed of 30 trailers and tiny homes.

Lemon Cove Village is also an amazing community to check. It is an RV Park surrounded by spectacular scenery including rocks, mountains, oak trees and fresh air. It is located in the foothills of the western Sierra Nevada mountain range and near the entrance of the Sequoia National Park and Kings Canyon National Park.

Project Sponsors and Funding

Starting a tiny house community is expensive. All the permits, project layouts, and tiny house buildouts can be costly. If you already have a group of tiny house owners, ask each one of them if they are amenable to sharing the initial cost of building your tiny house community.

If not, you would need to do some advertising and funding to support the different stages of your community buildout. Look for sponsors that can help provide materials in building the houses. You have to look for companies who can provide affordable tiny house kits or DIY tiny house kits. Show them that you are serious and align your community with a ‘brand’ that they can relate.

Another way to raise funds is through crowdfunding. Tiny House Big Solution created an outline for creating a successful crowdfunding campaign. You can choose from the top 20 crowdfunding platforms to start your crowdfunding journey.

Another recommendation from Rustum that you can do aside from crowdfunding is “To find as few funders as needed that are in alignment with the village, but do not intend to live there.”
On the other hand, Trepanier suggests “pre-sales and community bonds.”

Sustainable Living

A key factor in a successful tiny house community is knowing how to support and enhance sustainable living after the houses are built.

Aside from the vision, you have to create a financial model that looks like a business plan in the end.
As Rustum said, “Once you have an idea of the parcels of land that are the closest financial and zoning fit for your village, do some visual modeling on the village, which you can use as designs to articulate what you intend to build.”

You have to understand your model and how it affects the sustainability of the village. In addition to this, build a community of people who are interested and want to help. Treat it as a project that you do for the love of it and as a business with a financial plan that is sustainable enough to get the village off the ground.

Furthermore, don’t ignore the community building side. Create a meetup group, a website, Google group for document sharing or a Facebook group for the article and social sharing. A great tool to try is Neighborland. It helps you in finding interested people within your city that can contribute ideas that help improve the area.

TINY HOUSE COMMUNITY, YOUR CHOICE, YOUR DECISION

TINY HOUSE COMMUNITY, YOUR CHOICE, YOUR DECISION</3>

The tiny house movement has brought a different concept of economical and creative living. This is more than living in a small house; it supports your ideals to live in a comfortable environment while spending less.

It is easy to say that you are willing to join the tiny house movement and be part of a tiny house community. The difficult part is to make a wise and sound decision if you are ready to face a new chapter in your life.

You have to contemplate, reflect and ponder on the advantages and disadvantages of living in a tiny house community. This is not a change of location or a change of house size. This is a complete change in our lifestyle.

The tiny house movement has brought a different concept of economical and creative living. This is more than living in a small house; it supports your ideals to live in a comfortable environment while spending less.

It is easy to say that you are willing to join the tiny house movement and be part of a tiny house community. The difficult part is to make a wise and sound decision if you are ready to face a new chapter in your life.

You have to contemplate, reflect and ponder on the advantages and disadvantages of living in a tiny house community. This is not a change of location or a change of house size. This is a complete change in our lifestyle.

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